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Don’t Save The Speaker—Let Him Go Down With The Trump Ship

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Don’t Save The Speaker—Let Him Go Down With The Trump Ship

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Published with permission from The Washington Spectator.

When your opponent is drowning, the old saying goes, throw him an anvil. Is Hillary Clinton throwing hers a life raft instead?

In May, the Democratic National Committee’s communication director Luis Miranda wrote to the DNC’s chief operating officer, Amy Dacey, with a serious complaint. The e-mail, part of the trove released by WikiLeaks, began this way:

The Clinton rapid response operation we deal with have been asking us to disaggregate Trump from down ballot Republicans. They basically want to make the case that you either stand with Ryan or with Trump, that Trump is much worse than regular Republicans and they don’t want us to tie Trump to other Republicans because they think it makes him look normal.

They wanted us to basically praise Ryan when Trump was meeting Ryan, or at a minimum to hold him up as an example. So they want to embrace the “Republicans fleeing Trump” side, but not hold down ballot GOPers accountable.

That’s a problem. I pushed back that we cannot have our state parties hold up Paul Ryan as a good example of anything. And that we can’t give down ballot Republicans such an easy out. We can force them to own Trump and damage them more by pointing out that they’re just as bad on specific policies, make them uncomfortable where he’s particularly egregious, but asking state Parties to praise House Republicans like Ryan would be damaging for the Party down ballot.

What a document!

Rarely has the tragedy of the Democratic Party across these past several decades of Republican radicalization been rendered in such crystalline form. Continues Miranda, “We would basically have to throw out our entire frame that the GOP made Trump through years of divisive and ugly politics. We would have to say that Republicans are reasonable and that the good ones will shun Trump.” He concluded, “It just doesn’t work from the party side,” then added a P.S.: “It might be a good strategy ONLY for Clinton (which I don’t believe), I think instead she needs as many voices as possible on the same page.”

You read this, and 20 years of Democratic Party history flashes before your eyes.

You see the mid-1990s, when President Bill Clinton, kneecapped by his botched initiative to welcome gays into the military, the defeat of his healthcare plan in 1994, and the Republican takeover of Congress the same year, responded by taking Dick Morris’s advice and defining his administration via the neologism of “triangulation”—living halfway between the screaming lunacy of Newt Gingrich on the one side, and the Congressional liberals in his own party on the other, thus enshrining a false equivalency that Democrats fighting to preserve the social safety net and perhaps to even expand it must be, well, just as extreme as the guy who said, “I think one of the great problems we have in the Republican Party is that we don’t encourage you to be nasty.”

There was 2004, when John Kerry’s Democratic National Convention team—at the height of the Iraq debacle, a faltering economy, and a series of corporate scandals capped by the collapse of a fraudulent company called Enron, run by one of George Bush’s old pals—vetted all speeches to make sure they didn’t criticize George Bush. (“Bush will come up this week,” explained Kerry spokesman Stephanie Cutter, “but we don’t have to tell the story of George Bush because the American people are living it every day. What we’re talking about is the future.” Only old man Jimmy Carter, God bless him, exercising a former president’s prerogative, dared defy the ukase.)

Then there was 2008 when, waking up to the smoking ruins all around them, the American people repudiated conservatism so thoroughly that Republican pundits like David Brooks began opining that their party’s “stale, government-is-the-problem, you can’t trust the government” rhetoric was “a disaster for the Republican Party.”

And when, instead of throwing ’em anvils, our new president made Kerry’s 2004 mistake all-but-official party policy. As he put it of our friends on the other side of the aisle in 2010, “no person, no party, has a monopoly on wisdom,” and it was time to find “common ground.”

Republicans, of course, do things differently. On the campaign trail in 1984, Ronald Reagan would say of the previous, Democratic, administration, “We were being led by a team with good intentions and bad ideas—people with all the common sense of Huey, Dewey, and Louie.” He called the Democrats’ ideology “snake-oil cures.”

The economy had bounded back that year from 10 percent unemployment, thanks to the delayed effect of austerity policies put in place by Jimmy Carter and his Fed chairman Paul Volcker. Reagan endorsed that course by continuing it, while making hay politically by assigning responsibility for every bad thing that had ever happened to the other party, and every thing good to his own.

This was his political job as he saw it: etching the Democratic Party in the minds of the electorate as not normal.

That’s the key word in the e-mail I quoted above: “normal.” That Clinton’s advisers “basically want to make the case that you either stand with Ryan or with Trump, that Trump is much worse than regular Republicans and they don’t want us to tie Trump to other Republicans because they think it makes him look normal.”

It would take more pages than there are minutes in the day, of course, to document fully the ways Paul Ryan Republicanism—“regular” Republicanism—should not in any way, shape, or form be considered “normal.” Let one example stand for zillions: the time even-handed Ezra Klein scoured and scoured Ryan’s 2012 vice-presidential acceptance speech, worried he’d be seen as unfair if he ran an article by one of his colleagues that found only one true statement in the entire text—but was forced to admit that even that one statement was an exaggeration: “even the definition of ‘true’ that we’re using is loose. ‘Legitimate’ might be a better word. . . . Ryan’s claims weren’t even arguably true.”

And, of course, Paul Ryan’s Republican Party nominated Donald Trump. The party did so with Paul Ryan’s eventual blessing. Meanwhile, the Trump campaign’s new campaign chief Steve Bannon publishes a web empire, the Breitbart News Network, that made its bones savaging Ryan—which renders him more vulnerable within his own party than at any time since he came to Congress in 1999. At best, he’s treading water. Now is not the time to help him swim.

You can understand why Hillary Clinton feels she needs to preserve a relationship with Ryan. If she becomes president, after all, she needs to work with the Speaker of the House. But if the eight previous years have taught us anything, it’s that the Speaker of the House (if the Republicans hold on to their majority) will not believe he needs to work with her. There’s a scenario, of course, in which he might be forced to work with her: if the verdict this November 8 is so devastating for the Republicans, up and down the ticket, that even Paul Ryan knows there must be a reckoning with his party’s radical past.

But it has to come up and down the ticket. Republican congressional candidates have to be tied to a Trumpism that is understood as the apotheosis of the recent history of the Republican Party. Because if they are not, it would be oh so easy for the survivors to say, on November 9: It ain’t me, babe. I’m a Ryan conservative, not a Trumpite. We Ryanites are normal, respectable folk. After all, even Hillary Clinton says so. And, when we utter that oath of office once more in January, and take our seats in the Capitol, we promise to go back to doing normal Republican things: treating the Democratic President as an illegitimate imposter; treating the responsible media as terrorist-abetting, lying cheats; making sure the economy works for the one percent, and shredding the government functions that work for the rest.

Congratulations, President Clinton. On that day, you will have “won.” But you will also have lost the best chance we’ll have in a generation to do what Franklin Roosevelt did: turn the Republican Party into pariahs.

Rick Perlstein is The Washington Spectator’s national correspondent.

Photo Credit: Gage Skidmore

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60 Comments

  1. Aaron_of_Portsmouth August 22, 2016

    One must conclude that the 2 major parties which define America’s form of governance are both saddled with serious flaws. Given the evidence that has accrued over the past several decades, the Conservative Wing has amply demonstrated that its focus is primarily on maintaining the status quo, and resisting change that benefits all equitably.
    The Left has flaws as well but seem to be more naturally inclined to be inclusive, even though that hasn’t always translated consistently in practice.

    But, the effort to at least give a semblance of trying to be concerned for all far exceeds the mean-spirited attitude that comes naturally to the upholders of a status quo.
    This can be seen even by just a casual observance of the attitudes historically of those in power whenever a new idea, or a new Message appears—the leaders or dominant groups always rise up violently in protest to any change that requires sharing or diminishing of power.

    “Fake it until you make it” is an alien concept to the status quo(conservatives). Although that idea may seem at first glance to be insincere, it represents a willingness to at least extend the hand of compromise and give it the “old college try”—an anathema to the Right Wing, as is education and putting aside the fear of “the other”.

    All other shades of political thought in between share the same flaws—just to different degrees. What needs to evolve is a system of governance not based on division and fear, but one that revolves around the axis of “The Oneness of Humankind”. Anything short of that supreme concept is doomed to fail in the end.

    Reply
  2. Dominick Vila August 23, 2016

    For me, Republicans in the current Congress range from Speaker Paul Ryan proposing to dismantle MEDICARE four years ago, to Mitch McConnell acknowledging that the reason for all the obstructionism, which delayed our economic recovery and ability to create jobs, was to ensure President Obama was a one-term president. Time to clean house.

    Reply
    1. Eleanore Whitaker August 23, 2016

      The absolutism and supremacy the Republicans believe they are entitled to goes back to Nixon. The Water Gate Burglar. Now, GHWB is trying to launder HIS part in the mess the Republicans dumped on this country. It’s easy for him now to reinvent his part in Reagan’s economic failures. Reagan is dead and can’t speak for himself. But that’s a Republican man for you. Always ready to attack knowing the dead cannot speak.

      Paul Ryan can’t dismantle Medicare without having to payback all of the payroll deductions on both the federal and state level. Does he think you just erase them all? Does he think all he has to do is pretent no one paid for them?

      Ryan and McConnell are dirty as dirty gets. Both are heavily tied to the Big 6 HMOs who provide a major portion of their campaign donations. Or, as McConnell himself publicly stated back in March 2009, “I know a lot of HMOs.”

      Yes..we are SURE he does.

      Reply
    2. idamag August 23, 2016

      Don’t forget their constant conspiracy theories. There are people who can be talked into believing anything. All those phony hearings cost $40 million dollars each. The party of fiscal responsibility?

      Reply
  3. Daniel Jones August 23, 2016

    Dear Mrs. Clinton:

    Just stop. I get it; you want to show you want to work with the radical right and calm this mess down.

    Just… stop. It doesn’t work, because (as I have said on many occasions) you cannot work with people who refuse to work with you.

    Reply
    1. Eleanore Whitaker August 23, 2016

      Dear Daniel Jones…JUST SHUT UP. We no longer care what you think or want. You are no longer the head honchos who get to tell the rest of the country what we can and can’t do.

      All men like you do is fight and battle with each other to the total detriment of our society and democracy. Time for you to sit down, shut your mouth and face the fact that YOU and YOUR Bullies are outnumbered.

      The time has come for the rest of us to shut your mouths. We are sick of hearing that “I HATE Hillary” BS.

      All we’ve seen for nearly 2 decades now is Republican and right wing men acting like they are Wrestlemania fans, snarling, sniping, bitching and bullying. If you can’t find something in politics that allows you to work with and cooperate with others, get the hell out of our country.

      Reply
    2. RED August 23, 2016

      Personally I’m sick to death of the “compromise game!” Oh Repukes say no climate change doesn’t exist, Dems say it does, so we meet in the middle? Uh no, facts are facts and truth is truth, there is no middle ground!! And on that particular issue, being halfway right still leads to a climate meltdown. You just winder do these people possess even an ounce of decency or a human soul? Seriously, how can you trade the future of our country and possibly humanity solely for your own personal gain? Proof positive that the donor class and their servants in Congress and elsewhere will never be satisfied until they have robbed the entire planet!

      Reply
  4. FireBaron August 23, 2016

    What we actually need are Democratic candidates who are not afraid of being Democrats. The time when they allowed the Republicans to define who the Democrats are is past. Stand up for what we believe in, as opposed to the Party of Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan, which is opposed to everything.

    Reply
  5. TZToronto August 23, 2016

    We can be sure that the Kochs will be pouring their money into the Congressional campaigns of the worst of the worst Republicans. There is no reason for Democrats to hold back on savaging all Republican candidates, especially when those candidates will double down on painting HRC as a corrupt, untrustworthy tool of Wall Street and Democratic Congressional candidates as enemies of common sense and “American values” (read as bigotry an isolationism). Ryan, et al., are like the scorpion hitching a ride across the river. Their evil nature will eventually come to the fore, and they’ll work to bring down the President and themselves–and the country as well. Can’t Democratic strategists see this? DO NOT HELP THEM!!

    Reply
    1. plc97477 August 23, 2016

      Unfortunately Dems need to walk a straight line. A study done about 30 or so years ago shows that repug will crawl over hot coals to vote for a repug if anyone throws dirt at him (yes even if it sticks). Dems will not vote for anyone throwing dirt. You can’t get elected if you are seen as unfair to the other side, if you are a dem.

      Reply
      1. RED August 23, 2016

        Not this dem!! In my view, it’s complete and total fairness to speak the truth about what lying scumbag pieces of garbage ALL CONS are. When a group of people are intentionally damaging and destroying the country and most of the individuals in it for their own profit and gain, then it’s not “throwing dirt,” it’s factually correctly identifying their positions.

        Reply
      2. Joan August 23, 2016

        That was then, this is now. That was before they attempted to impeach Clinton, that was before they spent eight years lying about and demonizing our first black President. I do not think you would find the same distaste for ” dirt” in today’s Democratic Party.

        Reply
        1. idamag August 24, 2016

          When someone is raping your daughter, you don ‘t stand there saying, “Please don’t do that.”

          Reply
          1. Joan August 25, 2016

            Huh, is this a response to me?

            Reply
          2. idamag August 25, 2016

            Oh my goodness, no. It was supposed to back up what you were saying. What the Democrats have been doing – being mild – evidentially does not work. They lost the House and Senate by being the “please don’t do that” people. I apologize for not being clear. I am sorry.

            Reply
  6. CrankyToo August 23, 2016

    If I’ve said it once, I’ve said it a thousand times: Democrats are cowardly and inept. And given half an opportunity, they’ll find a way to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.

    Throw Ryan an anvil – and aim for his head! Enough of this horsesh!t! Shred the GOP! Make it pay for all the damage it’s done to this country since 1980.

    Reply
  7. yabbed August 23, 2016

    Ryan is an enemy to any Democratic Party initiative to move this country forward. Democrats need to not just defeat Donald Trump but annihilate him and everything he professes. Democrats need to focus down stream and challenge every sitting Republican House and Senate seat. Now is the time to wipe the GOP out.

    Reply
    1. plc97477 August 23, 2016

      Maybe if we just made all dems read the ryan budget they would understand how down right scary that jerk is.

      Reply
      1. Eleanore Whitaker August 23, 2016

        Ryan thinks and acts “as if” he is the President. He figures 3rd in line to the presidency means President. Time to take this meanspirited crook down.

        Reply
      2. dtgraham August 23, 2016

        I think that budget was basically just the Nuremberg laws with the word Jew crossed out and replaced with poor.

        Reply
        1. idamag August 24, 2016

          Not a word about corporate and farm subsidies. That is welfare, too.

          Reply
      3. Nightflyer August 23, 2016

        I think the GOP plan is to defame Hillary with the e-mails, so that she loses support. Then neither get 270 electoral votes.
        The election goes to the House of Representatives, where Paul Ryan makes a big show of not wanting the presidency, saying he’s happy to serve as Speaker of the House, but when called upon, whips out his 40-page inaugural address and 20-point plan for his presidency, that he’s been preparing for months…

        Reply
    2. stcroixcarp August 23, 2016

      Paul Ryan is the enemy of all Americans, except maybe the wealthiest 1%.

      Reply
  8. Eleanore Whitaker August 23, 2016

    Yesterday, I listened to the Senate session on welfare reform. I am all for reform when it is fair and honest. But here is an example of the Republican BS they think we are too stupid to figure out.

    Sen. Pete Dominici of New Mexico, a Republican, stood up and said that the only way to reduce the national debt is to cut welfare, SS and Medicare. But wait, it gets better. His way and the decades of payroll deductions into these programs are completely erased as if they never existed.

    Dominici spoke as if the money for SS, Welfare, Medicare and Medicaid drop out of the sky or, worse, comes out of Republican pockets only.

    Does this dipshit want to explain why for 44 years I had payroll deductions taken from my paychecks to pay for these?

    Ryan has to go. He and Dominici are not going to be satisfied until every dime in SS, Medicare, Medicaid and Welfare we pay for goes into their Wall Street investment accounts.

    Which by the way, Ryan is guilty of insider fraud. He sold off his investments just before the Sept. 2008 Meltdown due to his “insider” advice.

    Hillary is right. Get rid of Ryan. He is like the attack dog leader. Without Ryan as Speaker, he stops acting as if 3rd in line to the presidency IS the presidency and he has to stand guard over the Executive Branch as some kind of Republican Hall Boy monitor.

    Reply
  9. FT66 August 23, 2016

    Every corner of the House must be cleaned thoroghly. The House has been dirty for quite sometime and has engaged itself in witch-huntings which are not beneficial to voters. Their aim have been to go after Hillary on Benghazi, server/emails and now they have touched the Clinton Foundation. One has to ask, did the Foundation start when Hillary became Secretary of State or what? For god’s sake, the Foundation started in 1997 when Bill Clinton was sitting in the White House as President. Why wasn’t any problem then raised by neither the House nor Senate? This kind of witch-hunting must be stopped immediately. It can be done by voting in those who want to work for people and throwing out those who have proved can’t.

    Reply
    1. Eleanore Whitaker August 23, 2016

      Democrats have to start doing the GOP has been doing. Chairing ALL of the major committees that collect and disperse our tax dollars. Why else would Ryan have been chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee before being speaker if not to “allocate” tax dollars from the Dem states and then get the House GOP majority to flush it ALL to the GOP states?

      The Dem states are managing on 55 cents for the $1 they pay in federal taxes. The Republican states all get back from $1.35 to $1.87 for their $1.

      The Republican states virtually live off Dem state taxes. Which you wouldn’t mind so much if Republican states like KS, IA, OK, TX, TN, KY, WVA and NC weren’t all crying poverty. How do you go broke when your state gets the lion’s share of every US budget?

      Reply
      1. Paul Bass August 23, 2016

        The majority gets to chair ALL the committees. That is how our democracy works. In order to chair the committees the Dems have to have the majority, which they do not.

        Reply
        1. Eleanore Whitaker August 24, 2016

          I don’t have a problem with that. Democracy must be doled out as it is intended. However, when that majority is biased and seeks to take these positions SOLELY to flush money to southern and midwestern states leaving the DEM states to raise taxes to be able to pay state and federal taxes, that shows gross negligence on the part of the “majority.”

          I thought the oath of office states that politicians are supposed to uphold the Constitution which is the foundation of democracy OF the people, FOR the people, BY the people.

          Not OF, FOR or BY biased politicians with armies of corporate cronies just panting for flushing of tax dollars that come out of our pockets.

          I live in NJ. What NJ learned about Pay to Play is something that has now gone national. When business interests become MORE important than the health, welfare and future of people, it is time to put a stop to that and call the Majority what they are: Biased toward ONLY their states.

          Reply
  10. Gerry Francis August 23, 2016

    Everyone wants change. We have 2 of the most despicable people nearly neck and neck for the most powerful position in the world. There is a better way – Johnson-Weld 2016
    http://us13.campaign-archive2.com/?u=2e6ba6432575346df4b4ba47e&id=6c964b8f45&e=7c8d3769a4

    Reply
    1. jmprint August 23, 2016

      One that is totally despicable (TRUMP), the other has a lot of unwarranted baggage.

      Reply
    2. CrankyToo August 23, 2016

      You should have quit after “Everyone wants change.” Everything after that is farce.

      There is no “better way” that finds a Republican in the Oval Office. But I certainly encourage you to vote for Gary Johnson.

      Reply
      1. Gerry Francis August 23, 2016

        I’m not sure I get exactly what you’re saying unless it’s that Johnson and Weld were members of the Republican party. Maybe as a third party they can bridge the gap and get something done. I can’t think of a better way to tell the Democrats and the Republicans that the American people are sick and tired of the bullshick that goes on in Washington. Neither Trump or Hillary are worthy of the position.

        Reply
        1. CrankyToo August 23, 2016

          I totally believe you when you say that you don’t get it. So let me break it down for you:

          “Everyone wants change.” That’s absolutely correct (though the majority don’t want the kind of change you envision).

          But the really wheels fell off your wagon when you said, “We have 2 of the most despicable people nearly neck and neck for the most powerful position in the world.” In the real world, (i.e. outside the bubble that Libertarians like yourself and other right-wingers occupy) Hillary Clinton is widely respected and admired. You cannot, with a sound mind and a straight face, declare her to be equally despised as Trump. It’s a farcical notion and it robbed your post of any credibility. Then you doubled down in your next post by saying Hillary’s not worthy of the position (POTUS). She’s probably the most qualified candidate any party has produced since the Democrats nominated her husband.

          And as to whether or not Johnson-Weld represents a “better way”, I believe the Turd Party put that question to bed when it rejected that ticket in favor of Trump-Pence. But again, I encourage you to do your civic duty on 8 November and pull the lever for Johnson-Weld.

          One last thought…. Any credibility you

          Reply
          1. Gerry Francis August 23, 2016

            Well thanks for breaking it down for me. As far as Mrs. Clinton goes – I didn’t say she’s not qualified – I said ‘not worthy’. She’s been caught in a lie and honesty is a quality I expect to see in a Presidential candidate. I usually vote democrat but lying is one thing I just can’t tolerate. AND – I couldn’t agree more with your assessment of Mr. Trump. Be well!

            Reply
          2. CrankyToo August 23, 2016

            Okay…

            I’m prepared to concede that one who is “qualified” may not, necessarily, be worthy. But one who is “worthy” (to be President of the United States) must, by definition be qualified.

            And insofar as honesty is concerned, you show me a politician who doesn’t lie, and I’ll show you a politician who’ll never be promoted beyond dogcatcher. One cannot play that game without being fairly adept in the art of prevarication.

            Cheers, Mate.

            Reply
          3. Gerry Francis August 23, 2016

            Agreed on all points!!!!

            Reply
          4. idamag August 24, 2016

            The thing is we have one candidate who has a lot of experience in government and a dippity do who isn’t sure what he is supposed to believe. He has taken out four bankruptcies and his potential first lady is being shown all over the internet showing her bare bottom in an NRA ad and a Hustler Magazine shot. Trump has chosen Newsmax (aka hate incorporated) for his publicity and Brietbart, the most hateful of all organizations, for his leadership. Which of them will you trust to make a better decision on a Supreme Court Justice. Is Trump going to have a fit when his wife isn’t accepted in civilized countries?

            Reply
  11. I of John August 23, 2016

    Obviously Hillary is trying to be practical about working with the GOP after the election. In the end, though, It would be healthier for the party and the country to allow the GOP to simply fail. That way it could be rebuilt after some soul searching. A good reboot with a clean start would help everyone.

    Reply
    1. idamag August 23, 2016

      Heavens yes. Let us get rid of those fascist like legislators and I use the word, “legislator” loosely because I am not under oath.

      Reply
  12. Apostol Pappas August 23, 2016

    Trump may surprise you all. Just watch that space!

    Reply
  13. jointerjohn August 23, 2016

    Mr. Trump is proving himself to be no different than Ryan or any of the other current republicans. He only lacks their ability to hide his true ugliness behind carefully crafted words. President Obama squandered his first two years in the White House attempting to play nice with those bastards and it didn’t do a bit of good. They are all products of the same nasty narrow-minded voter base that gave Trump the nomination, some just act like phonies when the cameras are on. They built him, now let them go over the cliff with him, hopefully there will be no empty seats on that bus.

    Reply
    1. idamag August 24, 2016

      Trump and Breitbart is who the Republicans are.

      Reply
  14. idamag August 23, 2016

    American Democracy is not a high priority with our Republican legislators. Even though they took an oath on the Bible to uphold the Constitution of the United States of America, they continually violate that oath. However, Hillary will try to work with them, even if Mitch McConnell says their number one goal will be to make Hillary a one-term president. Paul Ryan’s House has spent nearly eight years trying to keep the President from doing anything. I don’t care if any of you are Republicans, they are the most disgusting Congress we have ever had.

    Reply
    1. RED August 23, 2016

      If Ryan actually believed in the Bible then he couldn’t be an Ayn Rand follower, those two ideologies are mutually exclusive. And it’s very clear which one scumbag Ryan is committed to.

      Reply
  15. Jane Reiter August 23, 2016

    Don’t waste time and energy trying to change what is meant to be. Put time and energy in moving THE COUNTRY forward. It’s not about any individual; it’s about THE COUNTRY and its CITIZENS. Paul Ryan is one citizen in this country of millions. His importance is equal to any other individual citizen . . . no more, no less. Are you going to go to bat for me, personally? No? I didn’t think so. So why waste resources on rehabilitating Paul Ryan. If you believe you need a person who behaves as badly as he does and has, then you’re in terrible trouble already. Let it be.

    Reply
    1. RED August 23, 2016

      Jane, while I agree most certainly with your sentiment about how badly Ryan behaves, your analogy falls apart. The people who are our leaders have a vastly larger amount of power than other citizens. And Paul “Lyin'” Ryan has personally stood in the way of moving the country forward for 17 years, more so today than ever. How this for analogy? Say you wanted to be a road, a road forward, but on your planned path a large tree had fallen across the road. Now this tree is not anymore special than other tress, at all. But it is the tree that is blocking your path forward. So you gotta remove it or you can’t make progress. And this goes for all the ignorant Cons, they most be removed and personally I like to see them pay for the damage they have cause individuals and the country at large.

      Reply
  16. dtgraham August 23, 2016

    Hillary needs to rethink this praising Paul Ryan thing. While he may have said that there was no room for bigotry in the GOP, he did leave plenty of room for misogyny.

    In her new working relationship with the speaker, she’s not going to like his demands of: i) being complimented daily on his abs ii) being referred to only as Ol’ Blue Eyes iii) an annual sacrifice of one of the poor.

    Reply
    1. Paul Bass August 23, 2016

      She was in the Senate, and amazingly accomplished while there. You think she can’t handle Ryan?

      ‘She’ll knock his socks clean off into the washer’ is the kindest way I can put it.

      Reply
      1. dtgraham August 24, 2016

        I don’t know exactly what that means, but it sounds ruinous.

        Reply
    2. johninPCFL August 23, 2016

      I’m not sure it’s an annual sacrifice anymore. Seems like each appropriations bill has it’s own.

      Reply
  17. Zengo August 23, 2016

    Isn’t her praising him the same as throwing him an anvil?

    Reply
    1. JPHALL August 23, 2016

      To the Republicans yes it is.

      Reply
  18. RED August 23, 2016

    Very few things would make me happier than to see Ryan gone. Some of the things that would make me happier is to see Ryan unemployed, homeless, and forced to take minimum wage job and making too little money to qualify for a health insurance and unable to pay for any insurance. Yeah, these are a few of my favorite dreams! And before anyone whines about his kids and all that, don’t worry they would probably be better off with either the State or a another family without a father who believes the evil disgusting ideology of Paul Ryan. And we might all be a little better off by saving at least a couple of kids from growing infected with the Con sickness.

    Reply
    1. johninPCFL August 23, 2016

      I’m not sure. If Ryan goes, then it’s “know-nothing” McCarthy in the leadership slot. He’s as socially conservative as Ryan, but knows even less.

      Reply
      1. RED August 23, 2016

        Hey, you won’t get any argument from me that the next ignorant Con is worse than the last, they certainly are. They grow more ignorant with each passing moment. But first, if you believe Ryan “knows anything,” you are kidding yourself. He’s an idiot, a moron, and certainly doesn’t have a clue about economics or governing. Perhaps his only talents are lying with apparent impunity and following the orders of his masters in return for contributions. McCarthy is certainly an idiot, clearly. But you might could make a case that it might even be helpful to have an even greater idiot than Paul Ryan as Speaker. But in the end, it matters not, Con ism is a disgusting bankrupt shameful ideology and anyone who uses it to organize their life or thoughts is damaged and needs to be expelled from, at the very least, any leadership on our country. And they need to all be expelled, so keeping one ignorant racist scumbag in place to protect somehow from the next ignorant racist scumbag is not a real good plan.

        Reply
  19. Robert Cruder August 23, 2016

    Republicans abandoned facts, science and history during the Reagan administration. They could say anything at all to those who believe in talking snakes based only the word of someone in a funny suit. With or without the Koch brothers, the Tea Party was able to tell wilder stories because they wore funnier suits.

    Every Republican candidate has run to some extent on contra-factual stories. Every Republican already in office has supported contra-factual policies under the guise of party loyalty.

    Although Mr. Trump symbolizes the tip of the iceberg, the 90% that are invisible below water are still part of the same block of ice and must melt by the same light of day. Those who hold to facts, science and history would have already left that party.

    Reply
  20. OverthecliffRepublicans August 23, 2016

    The more House Democrats elected the more leverage they have to decide the next Speaker. The nihilist “Freedom Caucus” is not going to be voting for Ryan in the new Congress for Speaker. Maybe House Democrats and Charlie Dent type Republicans can agree on a compromise Speaker candidate and oust Ryan and McCarthy.

    Reply
  21. meridaest August 23, 2016

    First, they have to disqualify Trump. Then concentrate on the Senate and House. Nothing seems to be going contrary to that plan. If we get to October and Trump is going down, but the DNC isn’t yet lumping them all together, then I would worry.

    Reply
  22. Joan August 23, 2016

    It what alternative universe is Paul Ryan ” normal”. Granted Ryan is no Trump but he has endorsed him. Prior to Trump’s ascendancy he endorsed a whole host of policies which would be bad for the average citizen. He either wants to dismantle or privatize every government agency, with the possible exception of the military. Strange how much the congressmen who never and would never serve or let their precious offspring serve love the military. He is a poser of the very worst kind. I would love for him to have the extra time necessary to work on his marathon times instead of lying about them. Voters in WI. Please arrange for Ryan to have unlimited time with his family.

    Reply
    1. idamag August 25, 2016

      Yes, Wisconsin owes us for sending him to Washington.

      Reply

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