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Trump, Sanders Ride U.S. Anti-Establishment Tide To New Hampshire Win

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Trump, Sanders Ride U.S. Anti-Establishment Tide To New Hampshire Win

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By Steve Holland and Amanda Becker

MANCHESTER, N.H. (Reuters) — Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders coasted to victory on a wave of voter anger in the New Hampshire presidential nominating contest, thrashing traditional U.S. politicians in a display of anti-establishment power.

Sweeping wins by Trump, a New York billionaire, and Sanders, a democratic socialist, on Tuesday testified to the sizable share of American voters upset at U.S. economic conditions and willing to send a shockwave to Washington in the Nov. 8 presidential election.

New Hampshire’s verdict sets up a tough fight for Republicans in South Carolina on Feb. 20 and for Democrats there on Feb. 27. Some of the most monumental campaign battles in elections past have been fought in the state that holds the first primary election of the American South.

For Trump, New Hampshire showed he has staying power and can take a punch after losing on Feb. 1 to Texas Senator Ted Cruz in the first contest, the Iowa caucuses. His win showed pundits were wrong to think he would ultimately self-destruct based on his penchant for insults and imprecise plans for the presidency.

Democrat Hillary Clinton, the former U.S. secretary of state and former U.S. senator, now looks wounded, trailing Sanders by 60 to 39 percent based on 86 percent of the returns.The wife of former President Bill Clinton, Clinton barely won Iowa and now has been trounced in New Hampshire, where young voters liked Sanders’ populist proposals to break up big banks and have the government pay for free college tuition.

“People have every right to be angry but they’re also hungry, they’re hungry for solutions,” Clinton, 68, said after congratulating the 74-year-old Sanders. “I will work harder than anyone to actually make the changes that make your lives better.”

Clinton was headed to New York, home to her campaign headquarters, to regroup with top aides and prepare for Thursday’s Democratic debate. Her campaign has denied reports it is considering a shakeup but acknowledged it would be natural to add members to their team as the campaign progresses.

Sanders said his victory showed “we have sent the message that will echo from Wall Street to Washington, from Maine to California, and that is that the government of our great country belongs to all of the people and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors.”

Some 73 percent of voters say they think the United States is on the wrong track, and these disaffected people make up a majority of the support bases for Trump and Sanders, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll.

They are worried about the economy and distrust establishment politicians they perceive as being part of the problem.

SHADOW-BOXING TRUMP

Trump, 69, who has campaigned to deport illegal immigrants and temporarily ban Muslims from entering the United States, was in first place with 35 percent of the vote on the Republican side based on 88 percent of returns.

At his victory rally, Trump dispensed with niceties. He congratulated other candidates in the race but promised to soon return to his pugnacious approach.

“Tomorrow: boom, boom,” he said, shadow boxing while his supporters cheered.

The New Hampshire Republican race did little to clear up confusion about who would emerge as the establishment contender to Trump on the Republican side.

Ohio’s Republican governor, John Kasich, won a spirited fight for second place in New Hampshire, with Cruz, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and U.S. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida fighting for third place. All four were headed to South Carolina.

Bush, the son and brother of former presidents, lived to fight another day, making something of a comeback after a strong debate performance and solid weekend of campaigning.

“While the reality TV star is doing well, it looks like you all have reset the race,” Bush told supporters. “This campaign is not dead. We’re going on to South Carolina.”

Rubio failed to dispatch Bush, seeing a drop in his support after a debate on Saturday in which he drew criticism for repeating rehearsed lines from his stump speech.

“I did not do well on Saturday night – listen to this: that will never happen again,” Rubio told supporters.

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who called out Rubio for his robotic debate, fell behind the others in the voting and canceled plans to go to South Carolina, a sign he could drop out soon.

DISENCHANTED VOTERS

Independent voters wield special clout in New Hampshire, second in the series of state-by-state contests that lead to the parties’ formal presidential nominating conventions in July, because they can vote in either party’s primary.

At a polling station in Manchester, Joan and Roland Martineau said they voted for the two candidates they believed they could trust to shake things up.

Joan, 68, went for Sanders. “I like this views, I like the way he speaks, I think I can trust him,” she said.

Roland, 73, a registered Republican, went for Trump, a man he said was “more honest” than other candidates. But he said he would back Sanders over Trump in the general election in November.

Clinton had for months been the front-runner nationally. But a Reuters/Ipsos poll done Feb 2-5 showed Clinton and Sanders now in a dead heat.

Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook said in a memo that the Democratic nomination would “very likely” be decided in March, with the support of black and Hispanic voters key to victory. The next primary races are in Nevada and South Carolina later this month.

“It will be very difficult, if not impossible, for a Democrat to win the nomination without strong levels of support among African-American and Hispanic voters,” Mook wrote.

(Writing by Steve Holland and Roberta Rampton; Additional reporting by James Oliphant, Luciana Lopez, Ginger Gibson, Steve Holland, Megan Cassella, Emily Stephenson, John Whitesides, Jonathan Allen, Susan Heavey, Clarece Polke and Doina Chiacu; Editing by Howard Goller)

Photo: Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Bernie Sanders smiles after winning, at his 2016 New Hampshire presidential primary night rally in Concord, New Hampshire February 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

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100 Comments

  1. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

    Trump and Sanders victories were predictable. What was a surprise was Kasich’s second place finish. Kasich’s success, if a distant second place finish can be called a success, complicates the GOP establishment strategy even more than it already was. It was pretty obvious that the GOP establishment was counting on a strong performance by Rubio. Instead, they ended up with a virtual unknown in second place, and Cruz, the Tea Party favorite very much in contention.
    As for Hillary, all I can say is that she is in deep trouble. She may win South Carolina, but it is far from clear that she is going to win in Nevada. She has to change her tune, appear more natural, and make an effort to connect the average American, or her candidacy is going to end up the way it did in 2008.

    Reply
    1. dtgraham February 10, 2016

      You were right about Kasich and Bush in your predictions.

      Hillary, apparently, has an event scheduled for South Carolina where she will be meeting with African-American mothers who’ve lost children to police shootings. That has the look and feel of something that may really help her, more than Bernie’s breakfast with Al Sharpton will help him.

      He should have another event in S. Carolina to try and connect with African-American voters in a way that doesn’t look like pandering. With both of them, their concern for the issues of that community is sincere.

      Incidentally, Bernie picked up union endorsements in Nevada.

      Reply
      1. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

        What is resonating at all levels of our society is Bernie’s populist message. Talking about raising the minimum wage, an economy that favors the elite, income inequality, and other such themes is far more important to the average middle class and poor American, than all the other topics being addressed by Hillary and the GOP candidates.

        Reply
        1. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

          Sanders wants to dump the ACA in favor of single payer…How will that affect those on Medicare who already paid for Medicare for 40+ years? Sanders never specifically indicates how that will be resolved.

          Reply
          1. dtgraham February 10, 2016

            It would eliminate their co-pays, deductibles, and premiums.

            Reply
          2. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

            It also eliminates 40+ years of their payroll deductions that came out of their paychecks…What good are no copays, deductibles and premiums to seniors who pay $104/mo for Part B coverage out of Medicare they already paid for?

            Reply
          3. dtgraham February 10, 2016

            Isn’t he talking about eliminating the $104.00 a month?

            Reply
          4. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            The logic being presented here, if you can call it that, is that we should stick with the same old bad system because we’ve been paying into the same old bad system for a long time.

            What she and so many other Hillary supporters conveniently ignore is that the ACA would not be dumped until the new system was in place. At no point has Bernie ever said he would get rid of the ACA first and then hope to pass his plan later, leaving millions uninsured in the meantime.

            Reply
          5. dtgraham February 10, 2016

            Exactly. I didn’t know where Eleanor was coming from, except the way you put it, but that didn’t make any sense. I thought, surely she can’t mean that. I think she does. You apparently have to stick with the system that costs you more of your personal money, because you’ve been paying into that system for a long time. Huh?

            Reply
          6. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            Hillary and her surrogates have been repeating the same lie, so that’s probably where she got it from.

            Reply
          7. dpaano February 12, 2016

            But, isn’t Bernie saying the same thing that Hillary is saying….the ACA is currently working, but it needs tweeks to make it better? Bernie wants to make it much like our European countries (at a higher tax rate for all of us, but a lower rate of expenses being paid by the taxpayers), but I think that Hillary also would like to see that and feels it might be accomplished gradually by tweeking the current system. Both of their ideas are reasonably the same to my way of thinking…..just different ways of accomplishing the end game.

            Reply
          8. @HawaiianTater February 12, 2016

            Actually, no… what Bernie and Hillary are saying couldn’t be farther apart. The ACA is a capitalist scheme designed to make the private healthcare insurance industry rich. Bernie calls getting more people insured a step in the right direction but his ultimate goal is to get rid of the private healthcare insurance industry, which means changing a for-profit industry into a non-profit one by eliminating the companies who are getting rich at the expense of people’s lives. Hillary is saying the exact opposite of that. She wants to keep Obama’s capitalist scheme and it expand it even further so her rich buddies can get even more rich. When she says “universal healthcare”, what she really means is everyone paying for private healthcare insurance.

            Make no mistake about it, their ideas of universal healthcare are the exact opposites of each other.

            Reply
          9. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

            That’s the problem with Bernie’s proposals. They sound great, but with the GOP in full control of Congress – and the purse – none of them are going to be implemented.

            Reply
          10. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            Why is it that everyone assumes Republican control of Congress is a foregone conclusion? They have elections too, ya know. Regaining the House this year might be difficult thanks to gerrymandering but there is a strong possibility of the Senate being back in Dem hands.

            Plus, that logic applies to Hillary too. If you assume that the GOP will maintain control of Congress, then nothing she wants to do will get passed either. If nothing is going to get passed anyways, I’d rather at least try for big things with Bernie instead of baby steps with Hillary.

            Have you not noticed just how much the right hates Hillary? Look at how much they hate Obama and they’ve had much longer to build up their hatred of Hillary. There is no candidate the GOP has to offer that would turn out their base more than the prospect of keeping her out of office. Conservatives might not like Bernie’s policies but they don’t have a personal seething hatred of him the way they do for Hillary.

            Think about this. This election cycle has seen the rise of Trump and Sanders because of how fed up the people are with the establishment. Why would you think going against the rising sentiment of anti-establishment is a good idea? This is one of those elections where all the rules have been thrown out the window. You can either try to extinguish the fire or you can try to catch lightning in a bottle. With Bernie, there is the potential for sweeping change in Congress. With Hillary… well, maybe that’s why you are assuming Congress will stay under GOP control, because she represents the establishment that everyone hates so much. In the year of anti-establishment politics, nominating the establishment candidate isn’t exactly going to fire up the base and inspire the kind of turnout we need to make serious changes to Congress.

            Reply
          11. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

            Let me start by saying that it would not take much to make me change my mind and vote for Bernie. I like the sincerity of his message, and I agree with most of his socio-economic proposals.
            There is a chance we may take control of the Senate, but the chances of us getting the House back are small to nil. There are simply too many red states convinced that the economic growth and job creation that should be evident to everyone is just a chimera, and that the world is falling apart because of President Obama, to convince millions of Americans, including some Democrats, that the only reason our economy did not collapse, the only reason jobs are being created at a time when dozens of wealthy Republicans are off shoring jobs, and the reason our economic recovery was delayed, is because of Republican obstructionism. The problem is not the establishment, the problem is ideology, ignorance, fear, inability to qualify for existing jobs, and a media unwilling to challenge the ridiculous claims being made by demagogues and opportunists.
            Trump is, indeed, taking advantage of the fears and hatred that millions of low information Americans have. He is simply taking advantage of them, and they don’t realize it. Bernie is saying all the right things, unfortunately major changes in paradigm are not achieved overnight. President Obama understand that, and has managed to achieve progress, in spite of the obstacles he has faced, thanks to his determination, and ability to choose his battles.

            Reply
          12. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            I think the Senate is something like 24 GOP seats being defended, many of them in swing states, compared to like 8 for Dems. That bodes well in a presidential election year. I know all too well the situation with the House but gains are not out of the question. This is just my opinion but I think Bernie would be better at getting people to the polls in off election years. I can see him going straight to Congress and telling them to either pass what he wants or be prepared to be voted out of office, then holding their feet to the fire in the public sphere if they don’t give him what he wants. I can’t see Hillary doing that because she has shown no interest in disrupting the establishment.

            While it’s true that major changes don’t place overnight, they also don’t take place at all when all you attempt is baby steps. Incrementalism has never produced big changes. Minor tweaks won’t solve the problem when the entire system is broken. I know it might seem impossible because of how screwed up things are now but you can look back in history and see major changes that took place when the people of the time thought they were impossible. We at least have to try.

            Reply
          13. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

            An example of what can be achieved in a polarized political environment such as ours is the ACA. It is far from perfect, and regardless of claims to the contrary, it is a baby step compared to the more effective – and needed – universal healthcare, but it was a step worth taken, and a major accomplishment in a country where policies that benefit the general populace are regarded as evidence of evil socialism.
            I support tuition free college education, raising the minimum wage, seeking ways to narrow the income gap between the elite and the remaining 98% of Americans, gender and ethnic equality, and I support respecting the values and sovereignty of others. Unfortunately, we are dealing with a segment of our population whose idea of smaller government means imposing their ideas and goals on everyone else. People who go as far as proposing invasive procedures on women seeking an abortion, even when they do it to save their lives. People who interpret raising the minimum wage, and making sure that American who often work two jobs can put food on the table, as evidence of evil socialism and something that must be rejected. They complain about the erosion of jobs in the USA, and ignore the fact that most of the entrepreneurs involving in outsourcing jobs are Republicans like Mitt Romney! The claim they feel betrayed by the GOP establishment, not because the GOP establishment has compromised on anything, but because they have not used dictatorial approaches to push their way, regardless of what the majority of Americans want, and they do it wrapping themselves in the flag and pretending to respect the Constitution.

            Reply
          14. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            I realize that the ACA is good in the sense that it has saved lives but at the same time, I hate the concept of health care being a for profit industry. It’s one of my major problems with centrist Dems like Obama and Hillary. What’s so crazy about that is so many people on the right are convinced that the ACA is socialism when in reality, it is a capitalist scheme designed to make the health care insurance industry even richer than they already are. I really don’t consider it to be all that much better than what we already had. It only expanded what was already a broken system.

            There aren’t as many conservatives out there as the current political makeup would have you believe. The USA has secretly turned into a very progressive country, not that you would know it by the way DC looks right now. The key to unlocking it is Dems embracing the progressive future instead of clinging to the past. There’s a reason why so many older voters prefer Hillary and so many younger ones support Bernie. If Dems want sweeping change, they have to be willing to evolve with the times.

            Reply
          15. A_Real_Einstein February 10, 2016

            I do not consider Obama a Centrist. He would have been able to accomplish so much more had he not been inaugurated during the worse financial meltdown in history. It completely changed his calculus and no President has ever faced the hurricane force winds like he did from an opposing party. Considering that for 8 years he has faced incredible scrutiny and outright lies in a 24/7 news cycle what he has done is truly extraordinary. From giving millions access to health care to gay rights to climate change to renewable energy to dreamers to ending two wars to private sector job creation to the longest bull market in history to liberal Supreme Court justices to pay equality to cutting the deficit this was no centrist. He is by far the most successful progressive President we have ever had until…….

            Reply
          16. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            It depends on what spectrum you look at. By American standards, Obama is pretty far to the left, but all that proves is that our political spectrum has shifted so far to the right that a centrist like Obama looks like a leftist. By global standards, he is center-right.

            Reply
          17. Dominick Vila February 11, 2016

            …and so is Hillary.

            Reply
          18. Dominick Vila February 11, 2016

            Like you said, the ACA, which I support in the absence of Universal healthcare, is the exact opposite to socialized healthcare. It is run and administered by for profit insurance companies. The only thing the government does is establish standards and provide financial assistance to those who qualify for it. It has been a financial bonanza for insurance companies and medical providers. Let’s not forget that the ACA concept was was conceived by The Heritage Foundation, one of the most conservative think tanks in the country.
            The fact that so many pseudo “conservatives” support a social liberal like Donald Trump makes you wonder about their true ideological leanings.
            I listened to him on CNN during a rally in SC yesterday and most of what he said was about how beautiful his supporters are, how much he enjoys their enthusiasm, and how great he will be as President. Can you imagine somebody like Barack Obama running for President on such a platform

            Reply
          19. @HawaiianTater February 11, 2016

            That’s been the best part of this campaign. Trump has proven that many conservatives are not as ideological as they would have you believe.

            Reply
          20. A_Real_Einstein February 10, 2016

            Don’t underestimate Bernie. WE CAN TAKE BACK THE HOUSE especially in a National election cycle. Clearly the polls are grossly undercounting Bernie’s support because the polls measure likely voters. Bernie going to turn out a lot a new voters and bring many blue collar Republicans back to the party. With all those people voting Dem down ticket and GOP in a civil war and full rebellion don’t sell us short. Only Bernie can do this. Yes it will take courage but go with who you truly believe will fight for us and bring us the progressive nation we deserve. Think big.

            Yes we can
            Yes we did
            Yes we will again.

            Reply
          21. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            No one talks about it much but the polls are small sample sizes done over land lines. Bernie’s largest group of supporters by far is millennials. How many millennials can you name that actually have a land line? I’m Gen-X at 36 and I’ve never even had a land line, so the whole going cellular thing started before millennials came along. If you want an idea of just how much support Bernie has with the younger crowd, check an internet post debate poll. Bernie wins all those by ridiculous margins. Most of them he gets over 80% of the votes.

            The fact that so many younger voters have sided with Bernie and the older ones with Hillary should tell people that Bernie’s politics are the way of the future and Hillary’s are the way of the past. It seems kind of stupid to me to try so desperately to cling to the past when there is such huge amount of support out there for progressive policies, if only the Dems would embrace the change instead of trying to hold it back. Yeah, the House, as gerrymandered as it is, can be retaken if the Dems go all in on a progressive future.

            Reply
          22. A_Real_Einstein February 10, 2016

            They will come around

            Reply
          23. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            To use a surfing analogy, you have to catch the wave when it is peaking. Right now the anti-establishment sentiment is peaking. There is a chance here to ride that wave into sweeping change. If Dems miss the chance though, it might not come again for awhile and the damage done in the meantime could be immense.

            Reply
          24. A_Real_Einstein February 10, 2016

            The wave is only getting higher. Even the corporate media is starting to acknowledge the revolution. Her surrogates can no longer credibly defend her. The more they demagogue him the more they are turning on her. She has been completely exposed as the establishment choice in a non establishment cycle. It’s hard but have patience. She is a good lady but the party has changed. What happened last night was no fluke. I knew this was for real when Bernie turned out 12,000 people in Deep Red Phoenix AZ in June with no advertising. God Bless Bernie Sanders.

            Reply
          25. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            He even turned out over 10k in Tucson. The big shocker to me was when he turned out over 7k in freakin’ Alabama. Bernie has gone to uber conservative Christian college Liberty too. He has proven during this campaign that he cares about all Americans, even the Republican voters. You’d never in a million years see Hillary campaigning in such conservative locations.

            Reply
          26. Dominick Vila February 11, 2016

            The media is not the only one that is taking Bernie Sanders seriously. Have you noticed that their attacks are shifting from Hillary to Bernie

            Reply
          27. A_Real_Einstein February 10, 2016

            Wait until Bernie starts touting his civil rights record. It’s unbelievable.

            Reply
          28. A_Real_Einstein February 10, 2016

            Exactly correct. We lost badly in 2014 because we were not progressive enough. Our candidates ran from Obama and his agenda and the results could not have been worse. We lost the Maryland governorship? Really? No question only Bernie can create a movement to bring enough new voters into the Democrat party and the results down ticket will be nothing short of spectacular. After all it was only a few years ago that we had a supermajority on the Senate and a majority in the House. Bernie is not just giving a voice to the voiceless ~ he is teaching them how to speak.

            Reply
    2. jif6360 February 10, 2016

      Hillary might not even win in South Carolina.
      https://youtu.be/eifKBDz3nU0

      Reply
    3. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

      I agree…and with that predictability comes the inevitability…When the Republicans vote …it won’t be for Sanders…President Trump, though they are to his tactics, is better than Sanders.

      Reply
      1. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

        The adoration they feel towards Donald Trump amazes me. I can’t believe the far right doesn’t understand the implicit meaning of statements such as the one Trump made yesterday to the effect that he will not curse if elected. In other words, he is doing it to satisfy the bottom of our society.

        Reply
        1. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

          I live in NJ. There are at least 10,000 people The Donald screwed when he closed the Taj in Atlantic City. Now, all those tax cuts he received from Whitless Whitman are being paid by NJ taxpayers…Some Americans hang onto some men’s lies like they were life jackets because they are super naive politically.

          Reply
          1. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

            Romney did a similar thing when he purchase DELCO, the automotive parts manufacturer, laid off its workers, shot down the plant, and reopened it in China under a different name…and the far right loves them for what these crooks are doing to them. Masochism or idiocy must be more widespread than most people think.

            Reply
          2. MVH1 February 11, 2016

            And completely ignorant business wise. They’re for him because “he’s a business man.” He’s a business man who screws people with bankruptcy and calls it being smart. He’s dreadful in every regard.

            Reply
        2. indiokie February 10, 2016

          Right ! Soooo, Trump is not “being himself” on the campain trail !
          And, in other words, he”s telling you what he thinks you want to hear, but will change as soon as he gets elected? He is so easy to read.

          Reply
          1. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

            Exactly! He admitted that he has no intention to behave like a moron when and if he becomes President, because the immaturity and irresponsibility he exhibits at the moment is only meant to reflect the behavior and expectations of his followers…and the latter are too dumb to understand the meaning of what he just admitted.

            Reply
          2. dpaano February 10, 2016

            Dom…..I agree with you!!! Most of his supporters are among the uninformed who have had their brains turned to mush by watching too much FAUX News!!!

            Reply
          3. charleo1 February 10, 2016

            And yes, Faux’s pretending to be a news organization, in all it’s ignominious gall. The confounding absurdity in it’s unlikely success in presenting an industrial manure spreader to the legions of gullible unhinged as the ultimate diviner of truth, has spawned a perfect image of itself in one Donald J. Trump! Congratulations, It’s a Boy! Are cigars still appropriate at these occasions?

            Reply
          4. charleo1 February 10, 2016

            As he pointed out, he could shoot a person in downtown Manhattan, and not lose a single vote. Does he understand these chestnuts, or what?

            Reply
  2. Bosda February 10, 2016

    FEEL THE BERN!
    GO SANDERS!

    Reply
    1. dtgraham February 10, 2016

      I love that man. Bless Bernie Sanders.

      Reply
      1. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

        And just how will Sanders face down Bloomberg who is planning to run as an independent?

        Reply
        1. dtgraham February 10, 2016

          If he jumps in, there’s no guarantee which party’s supporters will be more attracted to him, than their own party’s candidate—if Hillary is the Democratic nominee. On the other hand, no voter motivated by Bernie’s message will switch to Bloomberg.

          There was a lengthy post here late last week from a moderate, centrist, Hillary supporter who made it clear that she would be voting for Bloomberg if he got in it. I wish I could remember that poster’s name.

          Reply
          1. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

            Not true…you forget that a lot of the Jewish vote right now is going Sanders way…but Sanders doesn’t have the most important of the Jewish votes…the Wall Streeters…who love Bloomy. After all, it IS Bloomy who is big time involved in keeping their bank accounts fat. Not Sanders.

            Reply
        2. dpaano February 10, 2016

          He hasn’t gotten into the race yet……let’s wait and see. He says he’ll only enter the race if Hillary is not chosen as the Democratic nominee.

          Reply
  3. FireBaron February 10, 2016

    Will someone please explain to me how someone who had 65% of the Primary voters NOT supporting him can claim a victory? Trump said he was going to win big. Yeah, he did better than any other candidate, but it’s like the old story of the old woman peeing into the ocean and saying “every little bit helps”.
    The only thing these results tell me is either 35% of New Hampshire voters are extreme bigots, or they are fools who believe the undeliverable promises of a snake oil salesman. Iowa didn’t buy into Howard Hill’s promises, but some of New Hampshire did.
    Maybe now, the Republicans in this race based on their egos will coalesce behind a legitimate candidate.

    Reply
    1. dtgraham February 10, 2016

      Easy. The first past the post voting system where you have multiple candidates. That’s why almost all countries with more than two parties don’t use it anymore. They use a preferential ranked ballot or some form of proportional representation, or a mix of the two.

      Reply
    2. FT66 February 10, 2016

      FireBaron,
      Here is the explanation. Trump won by 35% because there are many GOP contenders in the race. If it were two contenders like it is in Dem’s side, Trump could had won New Hampshire by more than 60%. It is quite simple math.

      Reply
    3. dpaano February 10, 2016

      They have a legitimate candidate???? That’s pretty questionable, don’t you think…..LOL!!!

      Reply
  4. dtgraham February 10, 2016

    Memo to Satan:

    Start calling contractors and getting some bids. You’re going to need a lot more special places for all of those New Hampshire women who voted for Bernie and not Hillary.

    FEEL THE BERN!

    Reply
    1. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

      Give it up…the only BERN you will feel is higher taxes when President Trump wins thanks to you Saint Bernard attack dogs.

      Reply
      1. dtgraham February 10, 2016

        Ahhh you’ll get to love the Bern Eleanore.

        Reply
    2. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

      Would you mind specifically elucidating what the hell that BERN is? So far all I see is a too old fogie who avoids at all costs mentioning the price tags on his programs he plans to implement…the first of which I can guarantee will be to get rid of the Iran Treaty and turn Netanyahu into the Senator for the 51st state.

      Reply
  5. jif6360 February 10, 2016

    The results of the primaries are showing both parties our dissatisfaction. Now we need to intensify that message. Spread the word to vote out all the incumbents in congress and keep voting them out until they restore our voice and rights. No stronger message could be sent. Note the real power is in congress.

    http://www.judicialimmunitynecessaryevil.com/petition.html

    Reply
    1. dpaano February 10, 2016

      We need to vote in more Democrats and less Republicans…..in order for the House and the Senate to become bipartisan, there needs to be an equal number of each party. To have a single party with a greater number causes these groups to become uber-partisan, much like they’ve been this past 7+ years!!!

      Reply
      1. jif6360 February 10, 2016

        Both parties want to continue the war effort. Both parties want to strip us of our rights. Neither party wants accountability or for the people have a voice. When the rule of law no longer applies to public officials, we have serious problems. If u want truth go to my website.

        Reply
        1. dpaano February 12, 2016

          Personally, I think that problem is more a Republican problem than a Democrat one. Yes, there are some Democrats who might be questionable, but for the most part, the GOP is the group that fails to listen to their constituents and only listens to their “handlers.” It’s pretty sad what our government has become since lobbyists and Citizen’s United was allowed to invade Washington, D.C. We need to set laws against both of these groups!

          Reply
          1. jif6360 February 12, 2016

            SEE if everyone voted against all the incumbents the balance of power would do a 180. At the same time congress would get the message to start doing their job’s. 3 branches of government act as one. There are no checks and balance. They all care about one thing, power and money.

            Reply
  6. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

    Well that’s it folks. The President has been decided…The Donald wins. You can thank the Sanderista Saint Bernard attack dogs. Why bother with the rest of the 48 states? We all knew if it came down to Trump and Sanders, we’d end up with a Republican president billionaire. So when President Trump gets rid of the immigrants, starts to declare war and gets into it with Putin and Kim Jong Un, where will Saint Bernard be? Will he still be preaching from his pulpit?

    Reply
    1. dpaano February 10, 2016

      They’ve got a LOOOONG way to go before Trump is elected president. No matter what you think, I don’t think he has a chance in hell of being nominated as the GOP nominee!! He may be going strong now in New Hampshire, but there are several states that he may not even be able to put his big fat feet in; i.e., California, for example!!!

      Reply
      1. MVH1 February 11, 2016

        We can hope you’re right but if you’re not, we’ll see you in November for an update.

        Reply
  7. 2ThinkN_Do2 February 10, 2016

    To quote Dominick Villa: ” She has to change her tune, appear more natural, and make an effort to connect the average American, or her candidacy is going to end up the way it did in 2008.” This is part of the problem with our campaign system and society. If she is being who she really is, then she is being a candidate I can believe in. I’d rather see the real person and hear what they really plan to do, rather then some Trumped up garbage that is nothing but talk without the walk . . . .

    Reply
    1. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

      Okay …so she needs to change..into what? A MAN? These are men who do not want ANY woman in the White House unless she walks 2 steps behind HER MAN…who’s BSing whom here?

      Men hate women like Hillary because she is as smart and mostly smarter than some men. They hate her because she is the template for the Alpha Woman who doesn’t need a man to support or take care of her. SHE makes her OWN decisions…so the Father Knows Best Boys want Donna Reed?

      Reply
      1. 2ThinkN_Do2 February 10, 2016

        What the heck are you talking about? ?

        Reply
        1. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

          Dominick Vila posted that Hillary needs to change..What the hell ARE YOU talking about? Do you have zero reading comprehension? Or have you missed how Hillary Clinton dared to stare down that attack dog Gowdy when he lamely used bogus emails to try and nail her to the wall for Benghazi…and then there was Voinovich who admitted publicly in December that the GOP specifically stated they would get rid of Hillary…Like they got rid of Obama?

          Reply
          1. 2ThinkN_Do2 February 10, 2016

            I said in rebuttal to the DV quote: If she is being who she really is, then she is being a candidate I can believe in. I’d rather see the real person and hear what they really plan to do, rather then some Trumped up garbage that is nothing but talk without the walk . . .

            Reply
          2. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

            You are like so many men…who say, “Women can’t be trusted” Then, you elect a crook like Cheney who hasn’t ever bothered to be trustworthy much less show his genuine self in public. And in retrospect, thannk goodness he doesn’t…Satan would be envious.

            American men have this supremacy ideology that tells women…you are never going to be smarter, stronger or a Commander-in-Chief of anything but the League of Charwomen.

            I am voting for Hillary Clinton because to not do so tells the future generation of women they can’t measure up…especially when the measuring stick in controlled by men.

            So, make all the excuses in the world …but…until the women are no longer outnumbered in government of big business, nothing ANY man says to the contrary is truth or fact. Women are as educated, sometimes more so than men. Yet, they still lag behind in the salaries men pay them. Men just don’t mind women paying equal taxes from those unequal salaries. Excuses, excuses, excuses…

            Reply
          3. 2ThinkN_Do2 February 10, 2016

            You really should read what I wrote, rather than vent your anger as you typically seem to be doing . . . .

            Reply
          4. Eleanore Whitaker February 10, 2016

            Why do men always assume when any woman posts her opinions, it is automatically “anger?” Who wastes time on anger when being truthful and confronting double standards in society is far more important?

            Reply
          5. 2ThinkN_Do2 February 10, 2016

            I didn’t assume a thing; I came out and supported Hillary (as she is) in opposition to what DV said, about her not being able to connect, and you went off on a rant about men hating women. So, where did I assume anything about your character; it was blatantly visible.

            Reply
          6. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

            What you wrote doesn’t matter in the slightest. It’s either support Hillary or you’re a sexist male pig. There is no in-between.

            Reply
          7. Kurt CPI February 11, 2016

            And there it is again. Regardless of your reason for supporting Bernie, if yo do so you’re a male sexist pig. (Are women who support Bernie also male sexist pigs?). I think Beyonce should run for President. She’s female AND black. It’s either support Beyonce or your a sexist, racist male pig. To hell with logic, reason or any of those meaningless reasons for making an informed decision.

            Reply
          8. @HawaiianTater February 11, 2016

            All those women voters who support Bernie are just men in disguise. Obviously.

            Reply
          9. 2ThinkN_Do2 February 11, 2016

            Or as we now know; they were born that way . . .

            Reply
          10. dpaano February 10, 2016

            Eleanor….I don’t know what happened in your past that has made you hate men so much. I know that some of them are questionable, but I don’t think that a goodly portion of them are against women in any position. Yes, they lag behind in salaries, and that’s going to be fixed eventually (with the right person as president), but I don’t think that most men are as against women as you seem to think.

            Reply
          11. 2ThinkN_Do2 February 12, 2016

            Thanks dpaano, you don’t know how much I appreciate what you said here. Most of my life I have talked more with women than I have men; not really into that competition BS that some people like to get into. Apparently it’s not just men that get into that.

            Reply
          12. dpaano February 12, 2016

            Thank you for appreciating my comment. I have great respect for Eleanore, but it gets tiring hearing her put down all men….not ALL men are against women in power. I know quite a few who actually feel that they are a bonus and NOT a problem. I just hope that Eleanore can get through her anti-men problem, and I feel for her if she was treated badly in the past.

            Reply
          13. yabbed February 10, 2016

            Hillary Clinton is the only qualified candidate from either party who has the experience, the rational thinking, and the reality to be President of the United States.

            Reply
          14. A_Real_Einstein February 10, 2016

            Transcripts please?

            Reply
        2. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

          She’s going off on another of her rage rants again. I wouldn’t pay it any mind.

          Reply
          1. Eleanore Whitaker February 11, 2016

            Not working anymore tator tot…I don’t rant..that is just your male need to hide your cowardice by pretending women rant and rate…What the hell do women need all those restraining orders for if you men NEVER rant and rage? Joel Steinberg the oh so intelligent King of Women Batterers remind you of how you MEN rant and rage?

            Reply
          2. @HawaiianTater February 11, 2016

            You’re right. All the women support Hillary and Bernie Bros are misogynistic pigs. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a8e5d18d9febd6b8a2b322335130da39370e4cb71fbb5804d46be5344514161a.png

            Reply
        3. Eleanore Whitaker February 11, 2016

          awwww…your Manspeak not intelligible? The more you men play your games, the worse your situation will get. But nice try on pretending you don’t know what I’m talking about. Want to try the next Mr. Man BS act? You know the one? Patronizing the little woman to insult her intelligence? Get a life…I hear ISIS calling you bulls.

          Reply
      2. mike February 10, 2016

        Bull roar! Women voted for Sanders in large numbers because they felt he was HONEST.
        90% of voters said honesty a factor.
        There went your “monolithic” women voting for Hillary because she is a women.
        BTW, besides being a liar and trustworthy Hillary is a lousy candidate.

        Reply
      3. @HawaiianTater February 10, 2016

        All those men who hate Hillary for being a woman should be ashamed of themselves.

        Reply
      4. Dominick Vila February 10, 2016

        Hillary’s problems have absolutely nothing to do with gender, at least not when it comes to Democrats and most Independents. As far as I am concerned, it also has nothing to do with Benghazi or e-mails. Her problem is that, for reasons I can’t pin point, she cannot connect with the average person. Take a close look the next time you see her listening to an interlocutor, eyes wide open, and with an anxiety that simply does not seem genuine. As for Trump, the guy makes me sick. I still support Hillary, but I cannot say that I am too impressed with her campaign and the impression of being too detached or unnatural. Bernie looks and sounds like the real thing. That’s why so many people, including women, support him.

        Reply
      5. dpaano February 10, 2016

        Eleanor…usually I agree with you, but I don’t think her being a woman has anything to do with her current problems. Nor do I think that her being a woman is a problem for most men. She needs to start working on getting younger women and the millennials back on her side; she needs to start fighting back with the BS that the GOP is throwing at her (especially the e-mail fiasco that isn’t really a fiasco at all), etc. I know she can do it, and I think she’ll be able to change some minds and win the nomination. I know that most of the men I associate say that this country would be better off with her than any man, Republican or Democrat, that is currently running.

        Reply
  8. FT66 February 10, 2016

    Am very confident Hillary will prevail. According to the counting we have so far (Iowa and New Hampshire, two states already voted), Hillary has 44 delegates and Sanders 36. Way to go but she will reach there.

    Reply
  9. Kurt CPI February 10, 2016

    This is the political establishment’s worst nightmare. As I said (to a chorus of nay-sayers) the one thing that we have as living, working Americans is our vote. If we stick together on this we can defeat the elite establishment and work toward taking our country back. Cruz, Rubio and Clinton (not necessarily in that order) are all entrenched politicians who have milked the system for personal gain. Trump has gained from political favors too, but not as an insider (the same root as insidious). Kudos to the NH voters.

    Reply
  10. yabbed February 10, 2016

    Sanders and Trump represent those who are not competitive in today’s economy. It is rough out there but it’s not because some people have advantages others don’t because that has always been the case. We have always had the Rockefellers, the Mellons, Vanderbilts and the Carnegies. JP Morgan made a lot of money while others didn’t. But the rich making money because of advantages is not a new thing and still others succeeded in life. Trump has the middle aged and older white people who find their job skills outdated and unnecessary in today’s world and they find their resentments given legitimacy by Trump. Wagon wheel makers went through the same upheaval as auto assembly line workers and cola miners: the jobs are no longer pertinent to the new world. But they love the GOP anti science rhetoric which keeps them from new jobs. Sanders is attracting the young whites from 18 -29 who grew up thinking they were so very special and consequently should not be required to work three jobs and live in a lesser accommodations to put themselves through college just because they aren’t all that special after all. Neither of these two unicorn salesmen can produce any of their gimmes, watch me’s, here’s for you promises. The Congress won’t pass any of it. No wall is going to be built for Mexico to pay for, no free college for all is going to pass. We’re not going to deport every illegal nor are we going to refuse entry to all Muslims. We’re not going to get a free national health care system, either. Once Sanders demolishes the ACA we will go back to the GOP way of insurance company terrorism.

    Reply
    1. 1standlastword February 10, 2016

      This congress that “won’t pass anything” is the catalyst for Bernie and Trump.

      Many in this congress have a short shelf life in the current political climate of anger, distrust and disaffection.

      I predict this congress will “pass” like last night’s meal as a smelly turd swirling down the toilet.

      The people will see to it!

      After the purge, we’ll see the effect of this campaign season on a new congress.

      Reply
      1. yabbed February 10, 2016

        There’s not going to be any purge. There’s not going to be any revolution. There is not going to be a new Congress. What’s going to happen is that a Republican freak is going to take up residence in the Oval Office and we’re all going to be ordered to pray. 🙂

        Reply
        1. dpaano February 10, 2016

          Let’s hope not!!!

          Reply
        2. 1standlastword February 10, 2016

          It’s my perogative to take pleasure in the belief that you are wrong!

          Reply
  11. FT66 February 10, 2016

    Ladies and gentlemen, women and men, like it, ignore it unless you don’t understand the whole process of having primaries and caucuses, Hillary will be our nominee. The whole process is to reach the magic number required to be the nominee. The path for Hillary is more easier than that of Sanders. Thats the reality.

    Reply
  12. dpaano February 10, 2016

    I totally understand that people are angry with our current government; however, it’s appalling that they think that someone like Trump will be able to change this problem. The problem is that the GOP has done nothing in the 7+ years except block everything that has EVER been put forth by Democrats!!! They haven’t done anything for veterans, nothing for the job market, nothing for our economy, nothing for immigration….and I could go on and on. Trump, if elected president (heaven forbid), will also not be able to do half the things he says he’s going to do…..he has NO idea how our government works and thinks he can run it like he runs his businesses (which he doesn’t run well, by the way). He has already angered many of our allies overseas (UK, Israel, etc.), and I’m not sure that he’ll be able to get them to sit down with him to discuss anything!! Or course, his answer to the problem is to go in and bomb them to pieces and steal their oil (at least in the Middle East)! Not sure how well that’s going to work except to cause more and more terrorist activities here in the U.S. and elsewhere in retaliation for his stupidity (and we though GWB was stupid to start the war in the first place….Trump would only acerbate the problem to the Nth degree)! He thinks he can go and build a 2000 mile fence between the US and Mexico (at what cost to the taxpayers, by the way), and get Mexico to pay for it (the president of Mexico has already put the kibosh on that one, as well as many ranchers living on the border). He also thinks he can just go and round up 11M illegal immigrants and ship them back over the border…..does he realize what a task this will be and how much of the taxpayer’s money he’ll spend on that ridiculous idea? Does the word “revolt” mean anything to him because that’s what would happen…..not only from the immigrants, but also from many American citizens who don’ agree with his ridiculous comments. So, again, it amazes me that people, ordinary taxpayers, still want to vote for him as president…..apparently they don’t realize how much of their money he plans to spend to do all the ridiculous things he’s been screeching about! Good luck with that….you’ll get what you paid for…..and you’ll keep paying and paying!

    Reply

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