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Two Republican Rivals Blast Trump For Muslim Database Comments

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Two Republican Rivals Blast Trump For Muslim Database Comments

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By Ginger Gibson and Susan Heavey

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump drew rebukes from two White House rivals on Friday for saying he would implement a database to keep track of Muslims in the United States and require them to register in response to the attacks in Paris.

Trump, interviewed by NBC News after a campaign appearance in Iowa on Thursday night, was asked if there should be a database to monitor Muslims in the United States.

“I would certainly implement that, absolutely,” he said. Asked how that differed from efforts last century to track Jews in Nazi Germany, and said: “You tell me.”

His comments came amid renewed security concerns following the Islamic State attacks in Paris last week that killed at least 129 people, and a political fight over U.S. plans to take in 10,000 refugees from Syria.

Two Republican presidential rivals, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Ohio Governor John Kasich, criticized Trump’s Muslim database proposal.

“That’s just wrong,” Bush said on CNBC on Friday.

“It’s manipulating people’s angst and their fears,” he said. “That’s not strength. That’s weakness.”

Kasich, whose Super PAC is launching a $2.5 million series of attacks against Trump, said the proposal proved the real estate mogul was not worthy of the White House.

“The idea that someone would have to register with the federal government because of their religion strikes against all that we have believed in our nation’s history,” Kasich said in a statement. “It is yet another example of trying to divide people, one against the other. Donald Trump is unable to unite and lead our country.”

Trump tied his database proposal to his immigration policy, which has become a central focus of his campaign for the Republican nomination in the November 2016 election.

Trump, who leads the Republican presidential field in opinion polls, has called for deporting the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in America and building a large wall along the border with Mexico.

Trump, who earlier in the week called for shutting down American mosques, said Muslims would be legally required to register for the database and would be signed up “at different places.”

“There should be a lot of systems, beyond databases,” he said.

Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton also criticized Trump’s comments.

“This is shocking rhetoric. It should be denounced by all seeking to lead this country,” Clinton said on Twitter.

The Paris attacks have launched a growing debate on the 2016 campaign trail about the appropriate U.S. response.

As the debate over terrorism has gained prominence on the campaign trail, early polls show Republicans turning to Trump, a billionaire with no previous government experience, to tackle the issue. A Reuters/Ipsos poll taken in the days after the attack found 33 percent of Republicans think he is best suited to address terrorism, leading the field.

Ibrahim Hooper, spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Muslim rights group, said the rest of the Republican presidential field should say publicly whether they would close mosques, create a database of Muslims or require Muslims to carry a special ID card.

“This is way beyond the pale, this is basically a call to persecute a religious minority based on nothing other than their faith,” Hooper said.

The Paris attacks have also raised questions about U.S. plans to admit 10,000 refugees fleeing Syria’s civil war.

Many Republicans have called for a pause in the program because of fears that militants might sneak into the country. The Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill on Thursday to halt Syrian refugees but President Barack Obama has vowed to veto it.

Other Republican presidential candidates have backed such efforts, including Trump’s closest Republican rival in the polls, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, who likened Syrian refugees to “rabid dogs” who would put the country at risk.

(Additional reporting by Emily Flitter and Megan Cassella; Editing by Bill Trott)

Photo: U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign town hall forum in Newton, Iowa, November 19, 2015. REUTERS/Scott Morgan

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23 Comments

  1. shane patrick November 20, 2015

    clearly violates the 14th amendment to the constitution…not that most republicans have read it.

    Reply
    1. stcroixcarp November 21, 2015

      Not to mention the First.

      Reply
  2. Sand_Cat November 20, 2015

    Even worse are those who would limit Syrian refugees admitted to Christians. Am I mis-remembering, or was Bush one of those?

    Reply
  3. janis mcdonald November 21, 2015

    Who really thinks that these databases (watch lists) don’t already exist?

    Reply
    1. Robert Eckert November 21, 2015

      For every Muslim? I think you are missing the full impact here. Keeping track of those suspected of taking part in terrorism is one thing; criminalizing a particular religion is something else entirely: there really hasn’t been anything like it since the Nuremberg Laws.

      Reply
      1. janis mcdonald November 21, 2015

        Meaning to make it happen and making it happen are two different things. Trump knows watch lists exists, and that he’ll never be able to add entire Muslim communities to them. I think Judge Judy calls it “puffing” (building up what you really can do to hoodwink or impress people).

        Reply
        1. Robert Eckert November 21, 2015

          We should certainly hope that implementation of Naziism is beyond his abilities, but it profoundly disturbing that he thinks it good to say that such are his intentions.

          Reply
        2. Sand_Cat November 22, 2015

          See my reply to you above.

          Reply
    2. Sand_Cat November 22, 2015

      One would hope that a “watch list” is a great deal more limited than a DB of ALL members of a group, whether or not they have shown any dangerous tendencies.
      Still, you are probably correct in principle: as the technologies become available, excessive surveillance seems to be at least a somewhat bi-partisan affair, though my own view is that the GOP goes much further.

      Reply
  4. itsfun November 21, 2015

    Did anyone hear the whole conversation between him and the reporter? I did. When asked he replied we need a many new systems, then he went on to talk about building a wall and protecting our borders. He never said one word about Muslims or a database. The reporter then asked would his white house implement this. He said yes, It was obvious he was talking about illegal immigrants and building a wall and removing illegal immigrants. He said it was a management problem. He said nothing about Muslims. The reporter who just happens to be a huge Hillary supporter reported this completely out of context.

    Reply
    1. Cloudherder November 21, 2015

      Unlike you, itsfun, who can rationalize away anything that Trump says, no matter how fascist it is.

      Reply
      1. itsfun November 21, 2015

        Did you hear the entire conversation?

        Reply
      2. Sand_Cat November 22, 2015

        To be fair, Trump seemed preoccupied and not paying much attention when asked about the DB for Muslims, though I think I saw somewhere else that he had supported similar ideas, and I wouldn’t say it sounds terribly inconsistent with his overall ethos, which essentially echoes the old commercial (I’ve forgotten for what) which started “Promise her anything…”
        Let his GOP rivals beat him over the head with it until we get a clearer statement or better explanation from Trump.

        Reply
  5. Donald Hoffman November 21, 2015

    Donald Trump never tried to correct the reporter. If you think for one minute that this idea hasn’t been in the back of his head you must be crazy. Any person that could vote or even consider voting for a man who wants to turn this country into Nazi Germany is not running on all cylinders. Please read the other things that Trump has said in regards to this matter.. Do you honestly think that he would stop at just Muslims, his face is the biggest bunch of haters that I have ever seen in my 63 years of living. Everything that comes out of trumps mouth is laced with hatred. Be aware of who you’re voting for you personally may be on the right side today but his group could turn on anyone you too might have to register with the government, for not believing as Trump and his followers do

    Reply
  6. stcroixcarp November 21, 2015

    If we had a data base on all guns from manufacture through all sales, maybe we could figure out where and how ISIS gets its arms and who is selling them and who is profiting from terrorism and shut down ISIS destructive power at its source. How about getting an international arms embargo on all internationally traded weapons? How about going after the funding sources of ISIS (oil)?

    Reply
    1. joe schmo November 22, 2015

      LOL, yah and if they are stolen from…..or underground……

      Reply
  7. rednekokie November 21, 2015

    Actually,registering Muslim or any other religious persuasion is not such a bad idea.
    However, if you registered one group, you would be constitutionally obligated to register all, and I doubt if you could get a single Christian to take part — especially rabid evangelical Christians.

    Reply
  8. Dominick Vila November 21, 2015

    A national ID system is a great idea. A database to keep track of Muslim only is discriminatory and unconstitutional. So much for smaller government.

    Reply
    1. joe schmo November 22, 2015

      Cultural Marxist – another word for the Politically Correct.

      Cultural Marxism: An offshoot of Marxism that gave birth to POLITICAL CORRECTNESS, multiculturalism and “anti-racism.”
      Unlike traditional Marxism that focuses on economics, Cultural Marxism focuses
      on culture and maintains that all human behavior is a result of culture (not
      heredity / race) and thus malleable. Cultural Marxists absurdly deny the
      biological reality of gender and race and argue that gender and race are
      “social constructs”.

      Reply
    2. InformedVoter November 22, 2015

      You are correct about such a database being unconstitutional. Unfortunately, Trump NEVER said he wanted such a database. The reporter edited out parts to make it appear that Trump actually said it. The reporter asked Trump about tracking Muslims and then asked Trump about the Mexican wall. Every question that Trump answered after that was referring to the wall, NOT the database. This is a great example of how the liberal media twists the facts.

      Reply
  9. joe schmo November 22, 2015

    I guess the liberal media was caught in another lie. Oh well, ‘Leftists might control the media, but there’s not much left of it and nobody cares.’ I predicted this a year ago. Another I told you so moment:)

    Reply
  10. InformedVoter November 22, 2015

    This just shows how twisted the liberal media twists the truth and facts. The reporter asked Trump about a Muslim database and was told NO, Then the reporter asked Trump about his Mexican wall. ALL of Trump’s responses from that point on were about the Mexican wall. The reported edited out the subsequent dialog that migrated the “interview” to the Mexican wall. The fact that so many liberal believe this crap shows how low information they really are.

    Reply

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